Checkout these Resources: Part 2.

In my last blog, Checkout these Resources: Part 1: I started another blog series detailing the current career fields that are being utilized by the men and women of the U.S. Air Force. Thereby giving Corporate American recruiters, and any other perspective employer, a glimpse of the resources and Human Capital (e.g. formal education, On the Job Training (OJT), and experience), that is readily available to them via our United States veterans.

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As a reminder, the United States Air Forces has 26 different career fields that contain over 220 career field specializations. All of these careers fields, as well as their entry level qualifications can be found at: www.airforce.com/careers/. In my last blog, I covered Arts and Humanities. This group was the first of twenty-six career fields, and contained eleven of two-hundred and twenty career field specializations. Pressing on, I will discuss Allied Health, the second of the twenty-six career fields, as well as. Under this category, there are 26 individual career field specialties, However, due to the length of this category, I will split-up the career field specialties, and cover the first 13 of these specialties in this blog. These career field specialties are:

  • Diagnostic Imaging: “It’s the job of the Diagnostic Imaging specialists to assist physicians by taking X-rays of the entire body in settings ranging from surgery centers to imaging rooms. These professionals utilize highly sophisticated equipment and an intimate knowledge of human anatomy to help get these images and treat their patients.”
  • Histopathology: “Responsible for preparing tissue for examination, Histopathology specialists help with essential diagnosis of the diseased samples.”
  • Pharmacy Technician: “Responsible for interpreting, filling and dispensing prescriptions, Pharmacy specialists work with Pharmacists to help keep their patients healthy.”
  • Audiologist: “Providing the full spectrum of hearing and balance-related issues, Air Force Audiologists utilize the latest equipment and techniques to treat and safeguard Airmen and their families.”
  • Clinical Social Worker: “Concentrating on the social aspects of health, Clinical Social Workers help individuals improve the quality of their lives. From diagnosing various issues to offering guidance and counseling, these professionals offer services their clients can rely on during their hardest times.”
  • Podiatrist: “When a foot or ankle problem occurs, Podiatrists provide the medical diagnosis and necessary treatment to the affected area. From calluses to broken bones, these specialists care for a wide range of problems and help their patients heal from their ailments and injuries.”
  • Bioenvironmental Engineer: “Applying engineering and scientific principals, Bioenvironmental Engineers identify and evaluate potential dangers and develop programs to prevent illness and injury.
  • Biomedical Laboratory Officer: “Responsible for directing the services and integrity of their lab, Biomedical Laboratory Officers are essential to helping physicians accurately treat their patients. In addition to their scientific duties, these experts institute new methods, techniques and procedures to help their lab more accurately pinpoint the cause and appropriate care for a wide range of diseases.”
  • Medical Entomologist: “Concerned with preventing the spread of disease, Medical Entomologists study and treat illnesses caused by insects and arthropods and their vectors.”
  • Psychiatrist: “Specializing in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental health and emotional problems, Psychiatrists play a crucial role in caring for the overall well-being of their patients.”
  • Public Health Officer: “Responsible for preventing and controlling the spread of disease, Public Health Officers constantly monitor conditions and potential health threats.”
  • Public Health: “It’s the job of Public Health specialists to protect our forces from a vast array of illness and disease by minimizing health risks within our community.”
  • Physical Therapist: “Providing services that help restore function, improve mobility and relieve pain, Physical Therapists work closely with patients to help them heal and promote overall wellness.”
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In this blog, we examined Allied Health, the second of the U.S. Air Force’s twenty-six career fields, and the next thirteen of two-hundred and twenty career field specializations. It should be noted that the above career field specialties, and their extremely condensed descriptions are summaries that have been garnered from www.airforce.com/careers/. Furthermore, all specialty fields have preliminary requirements that include, but are not limited to, primary to tertiary education, followed by 7.5 weeks of basic training, and 35 days to 480 days of technical training.

It would seem apparent that these medical professionals exemplify the contents of Human Capital (e.g. education, On-the-Job training (OJT), and experience). I understand the value of these individuals at their entry level requirements, however, imagine their value following the years of service, educations, and training following the completion of their military obligations. That is why these U.S. veterans are a highly prized resource that needs to be heavily recruited and hired by Corporate America.

Please share your thoughts and leave a comment.

Checkout these Resources: Part 1.

In my last blog, Armed Forces: Personnel and Resources, I discussed the amount of resources and revenues that Corporate America invests into the development, and recruitment, of strategies that are based on Human Capital (.e.g. formal education, On the Job Training (OJT), and experience). In addition, I also gave some facts and figures regarding the U.S. Labor Force, as well as, the percentage of veterans that are part of the Labor Force. Furthermore, I discussed the perceptions that many civilians have of the military and its service members. Followed by a detailed example of how those perceptions and ideologies are misguided stereotypes that under-mine the true purpose of the brave men and women that serve to protect and defend our nation. To this end, I embedded into this blog the current figures of the number of career fields, that are available to service members and new recruits that each branch of service has to offer.

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Though it seems a bit early to start another blog series, I believe that it would benefit Corporate America’s recruitment teams, as well as, our veterans if I were to start the process of detailing out the career fields that are available. Thereby giving Corporate American recruiters a glimpse of the resources and Human Capital (.e.g. formal education, On the Job Training (OJT), and experience), that is readily available to them via our United States veterans. Therefore, I will begin with the U.S. Air Force.

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As of August 11, 2017, the United States Air Forces has 26 different career fields that contain over 220 career field specializations. All of these careers fields, as well as their entry level qualifications can be found at: www.airforce.com/careers/. The first career field to be examined is Arts and Humanity. Contained within this career field are 11 career field specializations, and they are:

  • Crypotologic Language Analyst: “Use foreign language skills to search for, identify, and process other communications.”
  • Logistics Plans: “Prepare, evaluate, and supervise all aspects of mission planning.
  • Band Officer: “Band Officers are responsible for honing the skills of Air Force band personnel as well as bringing ceremony, feeling and ambience to all of their performances.”
  • Regional Band: “Perform events at various regions around the United States.”
  • Premier Band: “Perform in and with various assembles throughout the United States and around the world.”
  • Public Affairs Officer: “Delivers candid and timely communication counsel and guidance to leaders.”
  • Photo Journalist: “Prepare and release news and imagery for internal and public audiences.
  • Chaplain Officer: Manage and support spiritual centers on military installations around the world.”
  • Personnel Officer:” Formulate personal plans and programs and develop policies.”
  • Personnel: “Assist and counsel military personnel, and dependents, on matters that concern them in the Air Force community.”
  • Services: “Manage and direct Force Support programs, operations and retail operations.”

As we examine just the first of twenty-six career fields, and eleven of two-hundred and twenty career field specializations, I cannot help but notice the amount of diversity that is involved in this group. When you add the minimum entry level qualifications, as well as, the required primary to tertiary education, followed by 7.5 weeks of basic training, and 35 days to 480 days of technical training, it is easy to determine how these individuals are a desired resource at an entry level stage. However, our target resources are veterans.

The fact that they gain more technical training, Professional Military Educations (as described in my Progression Towards Leadership series), and experience makes U.S. veterans a highly prized resource that needs to be heavily recruited and hired by Corporate America.

Please share your thoughts and leave a comment.

Armed Forces: Personnel and Resources.

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In my last blog, Progression Towards Leadership: Summary, I discussed the resources and revenue that Corporate America has invested towards the development of recruitment strategies that are based on Human Capital (.e.g. formal education, On the Job Training (OJT), and experience). Additionally, I noted that Corporate America recruitment teams are only able to interview approximately 1.125 percent of the United States Labor Force that fall within their demographics for Human Capital, mainly college campuses. I also gave the 2016 figures for the United States Labor Force, as well as, the 2016 figures for the veterans that are part of the labor force. Finally, I surmised that it would seem reasonable to think that corporate recruiters would widen their demographics to include prior service members.

I understand how many people perceive the military and its services members:

  • The Air Force is where commercial pilots get trained.
  • The Navy is where Disney Cruise Lines hires the nice people for their ships.
  • The Army is that group of guys that go mountain climbing in the morning, and then have coffee with a guy named First Sergeant.
  • The Coast Guard are federally funded life guards…
  • Oh, and the Marines are those special people that pick fights with other people on the land, on the sea, and in the air…

While some of these ideologies have a hint of truth to them, the fact remains that, the vast majority of our veterans possess the knowledge and expertise regarding specialized career fields that mirrors their civilian counter parts. Simply put, not every Airmen is a pilot, nor is every Sailor a captain, not every soldier climbs a mountain, in the morning, for a cup of coffee, and not every Marine is a multi-elemental fighter. But the primary mission of any Airman, Sailor, Soldier, and Marine is to defend the United States and its interests from threats both foreign and domestic.

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To accomplish their primary mission, Airmen, Sailors, Soldiers, and Marines are part of specific career fields. To help put this concept into perspective, I want you to think of a career field as a major category and career field specialization as a sub-category. Therefore, Computers & Computer Science would be the career field (major category), and Cyber Systems Operations would be the career field specialization (sub-category). To illustrate how many career field specializations are in the United States Armed Forces, I would like you to consider the following:

It is staggering to think that each individual department (Air Force, Navy, Army, and Marines) has hundreds of individual career field specializations. Furthermore, every individual within these specific career fields receives years of education, years of on-the-job training (OJT), years of experience, as well as, receiving federal certifications for each accomplishment. This is the very definition of Human Capital.

Considering that Corporate America is investing billions into the development of recruitment strategies that are based on Human Capital (.e.g. formal education, On the Job Training (OJT), and experience), the question that remains is: why aren’t corporate recruiters widening their demographics to include a highly educated, trained, experienced and federally certified individuals, such as U.S. Veterans?

Please share your thoughts and leave a comment.

Progression Towards Leadership: Summary.

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In my blog, An Untapped Resource, I discussed how corporate America is constantly searching for talented individuals, or resources that would not only propel a corporation forward, but would also strengthen its infrastructure. As is my belief, veterans of the United States Armed Forces are an untapped resource that could easily be integrated into these corporate roles. I’ve discussed the resources and revenue that these corporations have utilized in the development of recruitment strategies that are based on Human Capital (.e.g. formal education, On the Job Training (OJT), and experience). As well as, the 1.125 percent of the United States Labor Force that these corporate recruiters invest their time and efforts towards. Considering that the current 10.9 million veterans equate to 6.8 percent of the U.S. Labor Force, it would seem reasonable to think that corporate recruiters would widen their demographics to include prior service members.

With that in mind, I chose to write about an element of business that is constantly addressed in Corporate America, and that is Leadership. Meaning, this blog series is designed to illustrate how the United States Armed Forces, in this case the U.S. Air Force, develops, educates, and trains their service members to become their future leaders, as well as, an untapped resource for Corporate America.

At the beginning of this blog series, Progression Towards Leadership, I suggested that the goals of career driven individuals were to become corporate industry leaders. In the pursuit of these goals those individuals needed to obtain the skills and knowledge that would assist them in their endeavors. In the civilian community, skills and knowledge are typically garnered through participation in systems of higher education (colleges), and internships. However, these educational systems, and internships, have not invested the amount of capital, time, education, on-the-job training, and experience that the Armed Forces have invested into the development of their future leaders. Yet, there is some resemblance between civilian internships and military apprenticeships. However, apprenticeships are only a minimal part of the military’s development process for their future leaders.

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When discussing the a general ranking system for the U.S. Air Force, this service branch uses a tier system found in the Air Force Instruction 36-2618, The Enlisted Force Structure. Within this AFI it’s written “The enlisted force structure is comprised of three distinct and separate tiers, each correlating to increased levels of education, training, and experience which build increasing levels of proficiency in the institutional competencies. The three tiers also correlate to increased leadership and managerial responsibilities. These tiers are Junior Enlisted Airman, Noncommissioned Officer (NCO), and Senior Noncommissioned Officer (SNCO).” To assist the training aspect of the Enlisted Force Structure, and career field development, the Air Force uses a skill level system:

  • 3-skill level (Apprentice)
  • 5-skill level (Journeyman)
  • 7-skill level (Craftsman)
  • 9-skill level (Superintendent)

Additional leadership development is achieved by the service member attending Professional Military Education (PME) courses, at different advancement in rank and skill level. There were four leadership development courses that were discussed in this blog series. They were Airman Leadership School, Non-Commissioned Officers Academy, Senior Non-Commissioned Officers Academy, and the Chief Master Sergeant Leadership Course. Each course has been developed and designed with every aspect of professional leadership and mentorship.

Regardless of the career field (e.g. Police, Fire, Medical…) the enlisted force ranking structure, and progressive training requirements, are universal throughout the entire service. Simply put, Law Enforcement and Medical career fields differ, however, each career field has universal leadership and management training requirements. These requirements are achieved through Professional Military Education, On the Job Training, and experience (Human Capital). Hence, my belief that the United States Armed Services, in this case the U.S. Air Force, develops, educates, and trains their members to become its future leaders, as well as, an untapped resource for Corporate America. Do you believe that veterans are a resource for Corporate America?

Please share your thoughts and leave a comment.

For additional information, please read my series: Progression Towards Leadership: Part 1, Part 2, Interlude, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, and Part 7.